The MTR command – A Linux network diagnostic tool

In the world of network administration, especially within Linux environments, having the right tools to diagnose and resolve network issues is essential. One such powerful tool that combines the capabilities of both traceroute and ping is the MTR command. MTR stands for “My Traceroute,” and it is instrumental in providing real-time data about network connections. In this blog post, we’ll explore what MTR is, how it works, and how you can use it to troubleshoot network problems.

What is the MTR command?

MTR is a network diagnostic tool that merges the functionality of the ‘traceroute’ and ‘ping’ programs into one integrated tool. By continuously sending packets to a specified destination, MTR collects real-time data about each hop along the route to that destination. This approach allows network administrators to monitor the network and identify issues more efficiently.

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IPv4 for beginners: All you need to know

At the heart of Internet system lies IPv4, a fundamental component that facilitates the exchange of data packets across networks worldwide. But what exactly it is, and why is it so essential to the functioning of the modern internet?

What is IPv4?

IPv4, or Internet Protocol version 4, is a foundational protocol used for identifying and routing data packets across networks. It assigns a unique numerical label, known as an IP address, to each device connected to a network. These IP addresses serve as virtual addresses, enabling devices to locate and communicate with one another on the internet.

An IPv4 address consists of a 32-bit binary number, typically represented in decimal format for human readability. The decimal representation is divided into four 8-bit segments, known as octets, separated by periods. For example, an IPv4 address might appear as “192.168.1.1”.

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​Linux, the object of the DNS cache poisoning attack

In 2020, researchers from the University of California and Tsinghua University found a new method to execute DNS cache poisoning attacks. Unfortunately, Linux, a very reliable OS, was the object of the DNS cache poisoning attack.

What is DNS cache poisoning?

A DNS cache poisoning (DNS spoofing) is a cyberattack that pollutes the cache on DNS resolver servers. This can cause the user to be redirected to the attacker’s server instead of the right one.

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How to use the Traceroute command?

Are you a network administrator and want to gain insight into your network’s traffic? Then, the Traceroute command is here to your rescue! This simple yet powerful network diagnosis tool measures the latency of a connection to a given destination and provides a complete route path and associated latency. In this blog post, we’ll deeply dive into the Traceroute command and discuss how to use it, why to use it, and its benefits. So let’s get started and learn more about this invaluable networking tool!

What is the Traceroute command?

The Traceroute command is a powerful network diagnostic tool used to measure a connection’s latency to a given destination. When executed, this command sends a series of ICMP packets to the target, each with an increasing TTL value. As the responses are returned from each hop in the route to the destination, the Traceroute command can display the route path and associated latency. It can help network administrators find latency issues, track down errors, and understand the route path between two points. It is a valuable tool for troubleshooting and understanding networks.

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​How to check DNS records on Windows, Linux and macOS?

Being an online business owner or a network administrator, checking DNS records will become a constant task for you. So better to know how to do it from now!

How to check DNS records on Windows, Linux and macOS? 

To check DNS records on Windows, Linux, and macOS, you can use the nslookup command. This command allows you to query DNS servers for information about a specific domain or hostname. Linux and macOS have another choice to check DNS records which is the host command. Both “nslookup” and “host” work well, but the second provides more detailed statistics and more options for precise searches. We do recommend using the host command!

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